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Diagnostic Testing

Diagnostic Testing Services (non-invasive)

  • Echocardiogram

    An echocardiogram uses sound waves to produce images of your heart. This test allows your doctor to see your heart beating and pumping blood. Your doctor can use the images from an echocardiogram to identify heart disease.

    Depending on what information your doctor needs, you may have one of several types of echocardiograms.

    https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/heart-attack/diagnosing-a-heart-attack/echocardiogram-echo
  • Stress testing

    A stress test, also called an exercise stress test, shows how your heart works during physical activity. Because exercise makes your heart pump harder and faster, an exercise stress test can reveal problems with blood flow within your heart.

    A stress test usually involves walking on a treadmill or riding a stationary bike; your heart rhythm, blood pressure and breathing are monitored. Or you'll receive a drug that mimics the effects of exercise.

    Your doctor may recommend a stress test if you have signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease or an irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia). The test may also guide treatment decisions, measure the effectiveness of treatment or determine the severity if you've already been diagnosed with a heart condition.

    https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/heart-attack/diagnosing-a-heart-attack/exercise-stress-test
  • Nuclear scan

    A nuclear stress test uses radioactive dye and an imaging machine to create pictures showing the blood flow to your heart. The test measures blood flow while you are at rest and are exerting yourself, showing areas with poor blood flow or damage in your heart.

    The test usually involves injecting radioactive dye, then taking two sets of images of your heart — one while you're at rest and another after exertion.

    A nuclear stress test is one of several types of stress tests that may be performed alone or in combination. Compared with an exercise stress test, a nuclear stress test can help better determine your risk of a heart attack or other cardiac event if your doctor knows or suspects that you have coronary artery disease.

  • Tilt-table testing

    If you often feel faint or lightheaded, your doctor may use a tilt-table test to find out why. During the test, you lie on a table that is slowly tilted upward. The test measures how your blood pressure and heart rate respond to the force of gravity. A nurse or technician keeps track of your blood pressure and your heart rate (pulse) to see how they change during the test.

    https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/heart-attack/diagnosing-a-heart-attack/tilt-table-test

  • Electrocardiogram

    An electrocardiogram — abbreviated as EKG or ECG — is a test that measures the electrical activity of the heartbeat. With each beat, an electrical impulse (or “wave”) travels through the heart. This wave causes the muscle to squeeze and pump blood from the heart. A normal heartbeat on ECG will show the timing of the top and lower chambers.

    The right and left atria or upper chambers make the first wave called a “P wave" — following a flat line when the electrical impulse goes to the bottom chambers. The right and left bottom chambers or ventricles make the next wave called a “QRS complex." The final wave or “T wave” represents electrical recovery or return to a resting state for the ventricles.

    https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/heart-attack/diagnosing-a-heart-attack/electrocardiogram-ecg-or-ekg
  • Pulse Volume Recordings (PVR)

    Latest test performed by our cardiologists and interventional radiologists prior to peripheral angiograms to determine any blockages in the legs. PVRs provide more accurate blockage locations than Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) or Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) tests.

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